Decompose and Recompose: the Imaginist Movement

by Valerio Saggini July 31, 2018

Decompose and Recompose: the Imaginist Movement

Not to be confused with Ezra Pound's Imagism or Russian Imaginism, the Movimento Immaginista (Imaginist Movement) was an italian artistic movement, with strong ties to Italian Futurism, created independently in 1927 by a group of young leftist artists with the aim of bringing together all avant-garde movements.

The group included among others Umberto Barbaro, Dino Terra, Paolo Flores, Ivo Pannaggi and architect and painter Vinicio Paladini.

Paladini designed the emblem of the movement which features two cogwheels representing the double movement of decomposition and recomposition of everyday reality that the movement set out to do in order to achieve a new reality "freed from economic coercion and moral hypocrisy." (Achille Castaldo and Carmen Van den Bergh)

We think that the Imaginist emblem is awesome, both graphically and for its meaning, so we couldn't resist printing it on a t-shirt.

Click to see the "Imaginist Movement" t-shirt →

 





Valerio Saggini
Valerio Saggini

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